XENON is Big

All the xenon must somehow get to and from the detector through the water tank, as must signal and high voltage cables, various sensors, and we need large pipes to get a really good vacuum for cleaning the detector prior to filling. We use one large pipe for this lifeline of the detector, an aorta of sorts. Here is spokesperson Elena Aprile illustrating the huge scale of the XENON experiment.

Elena in the Tank

Spokesperson Elena Aprile behind the opening in the water tank through which all connections to the detector will be made. Picture credit: The XENON Collaboration.

Observation and applications of single-electron charge signals in the XENON100 experiment

In XENON100, we observe individual electrons and describe this signal together with its applications in a dedicated publications:

E. Aprile et al. (XENON100), Observation and applications of single-electron charge signals in the XENON100 experiment, J. Phys. G: Nucl. Part. Phys. 41 (2014) 035201, available via arXiv:1311.1088.

The neutron background of the XENON100 dark matter search experiment

In order to search for dark matter, it is imperative that background signals in particular from neutrons are well under control. We describe the successful techniques and leading results from our efforts in a dedicated publications:

E. Aprile et al. (XENON100), The neutron background of the XENON100 dark matter search experiment, arXiv:1306.2303. The paper is also published in Journal of Physics G 40 (2013), 115201.

Response of the XENON100 Dark Matter Detector to Nuclear Recoils

Dark matter is expected to induce nuclear recoils in our detector. We have demonstrated that we have an excellent matching of our expectation and the measured response of the XENON100 detector to such nuclear recoils, with an agreement at the percent level:

E. Aprile et al. (XENON100), Response of the XENON100 Dark Matter Detector to Nuclear Recoils, arXiv:1304.1427. The paper is also published in Physical Review D88 (2013), 012006.

Limits on spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon cross sections from 225 live days of XENON100 data

Using data from the year-long search for dark matter with XENON100, we could derive world-leading limits on spin-dependent interactions of dark matter:

E. Aprile et al. (XENON100), Limits on spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon cross sections from 225 live days of XENON100 data, arXiv:1301.6620. The paper is also published in Physical Review Letters 111 (2013), 021301.

The distributed Slow Control System of the XENON100 Experiment

In order to operate the XENON100 detector in a stable way over the course of years, we require a thorough control of various operation parameters. The corresponding system is described in a publication:

J. M. Cardoso et al. (XENON100), The distributed Slow Control System of the XENON100 Experiment, arXiv:1211.0836. The paper is also published in Journal of Instrumentation 7 (2012), T12001.

Measurement of the Scintillation Yield of Low-Energy Electrons in Liquid Xenon

Our detector is so sensitive that we can detect individual photons and individual electrons. A description of the response of the detector to the latter is published here:

E. Aprile et al. (XENON100), Measurement of the Scintillation Yield of Low-Energy Electrons in Liquid Xenon, arXiv:1209.3658. The paper is also published in Physical Review D86 (2012), 112004.

Analysis of the XENON100 Dark Matter Search Data

Analyzing terabytes of background and calibration data in the search for just a couple of dark matter-induced events is a difficult process that we published in a dedicated paper:

E. Aprile et al. (XENON100), Analysis of the XENON100 Dark Matter Search Data, arXiv:1207.3458. The paper is also published in Astroparticle Physics 54 (2014), 11–24.